Egg Drop [Anything] Soup

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Egg drop soup! Less of a dish, more of a technique: 0:00 – Three Egg Drop Soups 0:42 – Cantonese Chicken & Corn Egg Drop 2:47 – The Stream & Stir Method 3:11 – Sichuanese Hot & Sour Egg Drop 3:54 – The Lading Method 4:46 – Lanzhou Milky Dessert Egg Drop 5:57 – The Whirlpool Method 6:31 – Does Egg Drop Always Need Thickened? CANTONESE CHICKEN & CORN EGG DROP * Ginger, ~1/2 cm, minced * Water -or- stock, 2 cups * Chicken breast, 60g * Corn, ~1/2 ear, or 60g (frozen is also ok) * Seasoning: salt, ½ tsp; sugar, ¼ tsp; chicken bouillon powder (鸡粉), ¼ tsp * Slurry: 1.5 tbsp starch – preferably root vegetable starch like potato (土豆生粉), tapioca (木薯淀粉), or waterchestnut (马蹄粉) – mixed with 3 tbsp of water * Egg , 1, beaten * To finish: sprinkle (~1/8 tsp) white pepper powder; drizzle (~1/8 tsp) of toasted sesame oil; chopped cilantro to garnish Note that if you’re working from stock, you can skip the chicken bouillon powder. Maybe add a sprinkle (~1/16 tsp) of MSG instead. Process: Fry the minced ginger in a bit (~1 tsp) of oil, and when fragrant add in the water (or stock). Add in the chicken breast. Bring to a boil, then down to a simmer, and cook the chicken breast until a chopstick can puncture cleanly right through it, ~5-6 minutes. Remove the chicken, and pound it with a back of a knife. Thoroughly shred until you can get the chicken into stringy, crumbly bits. Add the corn to the soup. Boil for 2-3 minutes, or cooked until. Add back in the shredded chicken and season. Make sure the flame is on low. Drizzle in the starch slurry in bit by bit to thicken, stirring constantly. If using the stream-and-stir method, shut off the heat (otherwise, keep the flame on low). Drop in your beaten egg according to your egg drop method of choice. Mix in the white pepper and the toasted sesame oil. Transfer to a serving bowl, sprinkle over the chopped cilantro. SICHUANESE HOMESTYLE HOT & SOUR EGG DROP * Ginger, ~1/2 cm, minced * Water -or- stock, 2 * Seasoning: soy cups (生抽), ½ tsp; salt, ½ tsp; chicken bouillon powder (鸡粉), ¼ tsp * Slurry: 1.5 tbsp starch – preferably root vegetable starch like potato (土豆生粉), tapioca (木薯淀粉), or waterchestnut (马蹄粉) – mixed with 3 tbsp of water * Egg , 1, beaten * Dark Chinese vinegar (陈醋 or 香醋), 1 tbsp * White pepper powder (白胡椒粉), ½ tsp * Chopped scallion to garish Same deal re stock: if you’re using stock, you can skip the chicken bouillon powder. Maybe add a sprinkle (~1/16 tsp) of MSG instead. Process: Fry the ginger in a bit of oil – lard, preferably – until fragrant. Add in the water (or stock). Bring up to a boil, then down to a simmer, and season. Make sure the flame is on low, and drizzle in the starch slurry in bit by bit to thicken, stirring constantly. If using the stream-and-stir method, shut off the heat (otherwise, keep the flame on low). Drop in your beaten egg according to your egg drop method of choice. Mix in the vinegar and the white pepper powder. Transfer to a serving bowl, sprinkle over a bit of chopped scallions. LANZHOU MILK & FERMENTED RICE DESSERT EGG DROP Note that for both the nuts and dried fruits in this recipe, we basically just used what we had on hand – so do feel free to take the same liberty. Some raisins and peanuts/sesame seeds might be nice, though. Also, obviously no need to pre-toast if you’re working from toasted nuts. * Nuts: peanuts, ~10; pumpkin seeds (南瓜子), ~10; sesame seeds (芝麻), ¼ tsp * Milk, 1 cup * Sugar, ½ tsp * Baking soda (苏打粉), ½ tsp * Dried fruit: dried apricot (杏脯), 10g; raisins (葡萄干), ~8; goji berries (枸杞), ~8 * Laozao (aka jiuniang) fermented rice (醪糟/酒酿), ½ cup * Egg, 1, beaten Process: If your nuts are untoasted, first toast the nuts. Over a medium low flame, ~6 minutes for peanuts and pumpkin seeds, ~3 minutes for toasted sesame seeds. Peel the peanuts and break them in half with your fingers. Reserve. Bring the milk up to a simmer. Add in the sugar and the baking soda. Mix in the dried fruit, let them soften in the milk for a minute or so. Add in the fermented rice, let everything simmer together for 2-3 minutes. If using the stream-and-stir method, shut off the heat (otherwise, keep the flame on low). Drop in your beaten egg according to your egg drop method of choice. In your serving bowl, first add in the toasted nuts, then pour in the hot soup. Serve. ______________ And check out our Patreon if you’d like to support the project! Outro Music: คนถึงคุณจัง by ธานินทร์ อินทรเทพ Found via My Analog Journal (great channel): .

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  1. Hey guys, a few notes:

    1. If you’re using stock for this dish, feel free to swap out the chicken bouillon powder. Perhaps add in a sprinkle of MSG in its stead (optional).

    2. Something that I’m a little worried that I wasn’t clear enough in the narration: shut off the heat before doing the stream-and-stir method. But for the other methods, keep the flame on low during the process.

    3. Another super classic egg drop – one that we almost did for the video – is a seaweed one. Basically same with the corn and chicken one but minus the thickening slurry (and corn/chicken obviously). Use the same soup base, same seasoning, instead of putting in the corn, put in a small piece of dried seasweed (紫菜/zicai), about 3-5g, let it boil for a minute or two, then shut off the heat and drop in the egg. Woks of Life has a solid recipe for that sort too if you’d like: https://thewoksoflife.com/seaweed-egg-drop-soup/ (we’d personally probably go a bit lazy, use a water + chicken powder combo in place of the stock)

    4. For the hot and sour, another approach is to add the white pepper and half the vinegar to the serving bowl, instead of mixing it into the soup over the flame. Does an even better job of preserving the fragrance of the vinegar & pepper – we did it over the flame in the video mostly for the sake of clarity (and it doesn’t make a huge difference either way).

    5. Steph sometimes also likes to turn her instant noodles into egg drop: add the whisked egg in before adding hot water, put the noodle back in the container, then put the seasoning on top of the noodle, then pour the hot water in.

    That’s all we can think of for now – might edit a bit more in a bit. Apologies if we’re a bit less responsive then usual, right now we’re in Guiyang, preparing to travel South Sichuan (Zigong and Luzhou) tomorrow 🙂 Check out our IG to see food pics https://www.instagram.com/chinesecookingdemystified .

  2. I just made some suan la tang, and tried the ladling method for the first time ever, because I never knew it was a thing.

    Perfection. I used black fungus, shiitake, and some lily stems, too. First attempt at a hot and sour from scratch, it was flawless. Thanks for sharing the method.

  3. I'm really bad about putting in too much egg at once(or just using too much egg to broth, usually both) when I do the stream in method, and I basically end up with egg custard.

    I'm gonna keep doing it, though, because steam eggs are amazeballs.

    Vegetarians can mock up a very nice bouillon replacement with nutritional yeast(brewers yeast supplement is an acceptable replacement), celery salt, and paprika plus maybe a little garlic/onion powder for extra flavor… The resulting broth is technically vegan, but I don't think there's anything remotely acceptable as a replacement for eggs dropped into soup. Sorry vegans.

  4. We all done it before, it’s when you try to cook an egg over your instant noodle on the stove but the noodle gets soggy before the egg is done so you go “OHH SHIT, I OVERCOOKED IT FCK” and take everything off the stove and just stir in the egg cause you didn’t get to cook it together.

  5. 請多享受陽光,多吃純素,無動物蛋、動物奶、動物奶酪起司、昆蟲蜂蜜。Enjoy Sunshine and Please be Vegan, no animal’s eggs, animal’s milk, animal’s butter, and insect’s honey🥬🥗🌽🥕🥦🥥🥑🍓🍇🍌🍎🍐🍑🥭🍅🥒🍉❤️🌞🌈👼❤️🏖

  6. thats pretty common in spain, at least in my family, but not in the same way, we just add the whole egg (obviously not the shell) and then beat it up when its in the soup, so you have tiny bits like in the video and some chunky bits with a chewy bite to it

  7. When my dad was about 5 he remembers standing by his mother while she made brown gravy ,, some 60 yrs ago they were very poor and I do mean very poor… itbwas biscut and gravy every day for them.. anyway. He would beg Granny saying Buttt n egg in it momma butt n egg init.. sacmble an egg or two and when the gravy is done pour in slowly like this soup and it really is very good. 😉👍👍 this just reminds me of it. Thanks for sharing and a stroll down memory lane too 💝🥰

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