5 min miso soup #shorts

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It’s been almost a year since I first posted my super easy miso soup recipe so I figured I’d post it again (especially since it’s cold outside)! Miso soup is one of my favorite comfort foods. Though it can be high in sodium, it can also be high in nutrients! The miso contains probiotics, the tofu adds protein, and the many vegetables you can add to it (green onions, wake, mushrooms, etc.) provide vitamins and minerals. 1. Combine 2 tsp dashi (I like Ajinomoto Hondashi) and 4 cups of water and bring to a boil 2. Reduce heat to low. This is an important step because boiling miso can make it lose its flavor and nutrients! 3. Strain 3 tbsp miso (I used Hikari Organic Red Miso) through a mesh strainer. 4. Add wakame (seaweed), silken tofu, and green onions.

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  1. It’s been almost a year since I first posted my super easy miso soup recipe so I figured I’d post it again (especially since it’s cold outside)! Miso soup is one of my favorite comfort foods. Though it can be high in sodium, it can also be high in nutrients! The miso contains probiotics, the tofu adds protein, and the many vegetables you can add to It (green onions, wake, mushrooms, etc.) provides vitamins and minerals.

    1. Combine 2 tsp dashi (I like Ajinomoto Hondashi) and 4 cups of water and bring to a boil
    2. Reduce heat to low. This is an important step because boiling miso can make it lose its flavor and nutrients!
    3. Strain 3 tbsp miso (I used Hikari Organic Red Miso) through mesh strainer.
    4. Add wakame (seaweed), silken tofu, and green onions.

  2. What type of miso is that? Barley? Looks delicious! 😋 Miso is my go-to soup when I’m feeling under the weather or eaten too much rich foods or sweets. Or on a cold, rainy day it’s perfect! It won’t make you feel bloated like chili, either.

    My mom made it for me when I was little. So, it’s nostalgic. It’s so comforting.

    You really can make it however you like, for those who don’t know: there are many types of miso, and they all taste very different, white miso, barley miso, red miso (red is my personal favorite, but different types of miso pair well in different dishes; for instance, if I were using veal, chicken or fish I’d use white miso, if I added mussels or crustaceans I could go with either white or red and red for richer flavors like red meats or added brandy – but really the only rule is your mouth – it should be pleased. 😋

    You can also use miso to make a roux or a slurry, simply by adding broth from what you’re cooking. You can whisk in a bit of flour or cornstarch for a thicker soup base. Mix miso and broth and voilà you have a soup stock you can use for all kind of soups – you can use vegetables like kale and other greens, carrots, parsnips, basically any root veggies and maybe corn!

    It lets you hold back on the acidic tomatoes or make rich soups without using beef broth or meat (although you can add these, if you like or vegetable broth).
    I have an excellent vegan French Onion soup recipe, for anyone who is interested!

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